What is Osteopathy?

Home What is Osteopathy?

Osteopathy is a primary health care system that compliments other medical practices.

It is suitable for almost any individual and can contribute to the treatment and management of a wide range of conditions. Osteopaths work mostly on muscles, joints and ligaments, through the neuro-musculo-skeletal system. They use a wide variety of techniques such as deep tissue massage, joint articulation, manipulation and cranial osteopathy.

Osteopaths view the body as an integrated and indivisible whole, with the ability to heal itself. This self-healing mechanism can be utilised as part of the osteopathic treatment process, with the core aim of improving the quality of function within the body and removing blocks to healing. No part of the body can be considered in isolation. Relevant psychological and social factors are also considered and form part of the process of patient diagnosis and management.

Osteopaths use their expert palpation skills as a key part of the diagnostic and treatment process. This also includes a thorough patient history, observing active movements of the body and examining the musculoskeletal system in detail. X -rays, scans and other clinical investigations are also used if required.

Osteopaths must be registered with the General Osteopathic Council in order to practice. Patients may be referred by their doctor, or they may opt to see an osteopath independently.

Conditions treated by Osteopaths

The most common conditions that osteopaths treat are:

  • back and neck pain
  • shoulder and arm problems
  • pelvis, hip and leg problems
  • sports and other injuries